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Issue Number: 321  May   1901

BAPTISMS
“ Suffer the little children to come unto Me, and forbid them not: for of such is the Kingdom of God.”—S. MARK, x, 14.

April 3 — Lilian, daughter of Henry and Sarah Ann Haynes, Bream's Eaves, labourer.
April 7 — Philip Neville Powell, son of Philip and Elizabeth Williams, London House, Bream, clerk.
April 28—Zella May, daughter of, Levi William and Bessie Matilda Miles, Willsbury Farm, farmer.

MARRIAGE
" What God hath joined together, let not man put asunder." S. Mark, 10.

April 14—by the Vicar, Thomas Henry Davis, bachelor, and Annie Maria Vaughan, spinster, both of Bream.

BURIALS
" Here we have no continuing city, but we seek one to come." Heb., 13, 14.

April 10—Ann Lewis Bream's Tufts, aged 84.
April 12—William Preest, Drybrook, aged 67.
April 14—Agnes Rudge, Abertillery, aged 35.
April 19—Isaac John Hancocks, Bream's Tufts, aged 6 months.
April 22—Fanny Malpas, Bream's Tufts, aged 59.

SPECIAL NOTICES
May 1—Feast of S. Philip and S. James, Apostles.
May 13,14,15—Rogation Days.
May 16—Feast of the Ascension.
May 26—Feast of Whit Sunday.
May 27,28—Holy Days.
May 29,31, and June 1—Ember Days.
June 2—Trinity Sunday.
Gloucester Triennial Festival for Churchworkers, Thursday May 30th.—Those who wish to accompany the Vicar to Gloucester must send in their names to him not later than May 17th (see last month).

THE CHURCH BELL
Cost of New Bell...................................£30..7..8
Inscription..................................................0..4..3
Fittings.....................................................£9..0..0
Bell Hanger............................................£3..12..5
Timber (J. Hughes & Son)........................0... 4..0
Labour (G. W. Taylor).............................0..19..2
Hauling (R. Lucas)....................................0..18..4
Railway Carriage......................................0....6..2

Gross Total...........................................£45..12..0
Allowance for Old Bell............................£9....3..9
Nett Cost................................................£36..8..3

The total amount in the Vicar's hands is £36..19..6 and the balance in hand towards the cost of a Memorial Tablet is only 0..11..3
The weight of the new bell is 4cwt. and 15lbs
The weight of the old bell was 1cwt. and 3qrs.

NATIONAL SCHOOL MAINTENANCE FUND.
Year ending April 3rd, 1901.

The Crown.................................................................£20..0..0
The National Society....................................................£5..0..0
The Bishop's Church and School Fund...........................£5..0..0
Mr. Taylor (use of Room).............................................0..10..0
Mr. North (use of Room)..............................................0...5..0
Mr. Preest (Band Contribution)................................... £1..0..0
Mr. Wm. Smith, Vol. Contribution......................................2..6
Mr. Taylor, Vol. Contribution.........................................0..5..0
Mis Gosling, Vol. Contribution....................................£10..0..0
Mr. Macfarlane, Vol. Contribution..................................0..5..0
The Vicar, Vol. Contribution.........................................£3..3..0
Mr. Hirst, Vol. Contribution............................................0..5..0
Mrs. J. Phillips, Vol. Contribution....................................0..5..0
Miss Hewlett, Vol. Contribution......................................0..5..0
Mr. A. J. Batten, Vol. Contribution.................................0..5..0
Mr. S. B. Jenkins, Vol. Contribution...............................0..5..0
Miss Batten, Vol. Contribution........................................0..5..0
Sick and Burial Society (use of room)...........................£1..9..4
Mr. Mullan, Vol. Contribution........................................0..5..0
Mr. Heighway, Vol. Contribution...................................0..5..0
Mr. Yarworth, Vol. Contribution...................................0..5..0
................................................................Total.........£49..4..10

HISTORICAL SCRAPS.

Nicholls in his "Personalities of the Forest of Dean," says that in the early years of the 19th century the Chapel at Bream was "a mean building with windows of the Stuart period and a Chancel Arch of much earlier date." and his statement will serve, as well as any other, to introduce to our notice those architectural features of the old Chapel which have been preserved in the present Church, and we will now consider in reverse order of apparent antiquity.

1. THE WINDOWS — The old ones are those of square shape, three on the north and two on the south side of the Church, and it must be borne in mind that they have been taken down and re-erected once or twice, and that there was an old window at the east end of the Chancel similar in style but with a pointed arch and with three lights instead of two.
These windows Nicholls affirms to be of the Stuart period, in which case we must date them from the reign of James I., the first of the Stuart Kings. Mr. Waller, however, the Diocesan Architect, as well as all other antiquaries and architects, whom I have met lately, declares the windows to be not Stuart but Tudor, and we may fairly believe that this is true and that Nicholls was in error.
There are windows, larger and loftier than ours, but of the same pattern, in the North Aisle at Littledean, and they contain remnants of the pre-Reformation coloured glass, and seem to have belonged to the Brayne Chantry or Mortuary Chapel at Littledean, and if so, must have been erected before 1553, when Chantries were all disestablished and disendowed by Edward Sixth.
We may, therefore perhaps, safely consider these windows to be early Tudor, dating from about the year 1500. Henry VIII., was not a parochial church builder, but his father Henry Seventh was, and our square windows may well have been first pierced in the Chapel walls in his reign.
These old windows are good of their kind, the difference between them and our modern ones being most marked, and Nicholls must, I think, be held in error when he calls the old Chapel "a mean building," for Tudor windows are quite sufficient to redeem any building from such charge.
2. THE PORCH ARCHWAY. — The ancient Chancel Arch, which Nicholls speaks of as being much older than the square windows, is gone, though, indeed, the stones of which it was composed — those of dark colour — have been incorporated in the present Chancel Arch. However, the outer Archway of the Porch, which like the windows, has been moved and re-erected once or twice, is built of similar stones, and is probably of somewhat similar pattern and of the same date as the old Chancel Arch. It seems to be of the style of architecture which is called Decorated.
3. THE PISCINA. — This used to be embedded in the south wall of the old Chancel, where it was used for the washing of the Communion Vessels and of the Priest's fingers. Like many other things in our Church, it has been moved from its original position, and it is now incorrectly placed in the north wall of the Chancel, too high from the pavement to be used for the original purpose for which it was made.
The Piscina Arch is cut out of a single stone — now broken at the top — and rests upon a trough-stone, of which the old waste-hole has been plugged with cement. The stone is similar to the other old stonework of the Church, and the late Mr. Thomas Batten, who knew it before its removal from its original place, declared that it clearly formed an integral part of the old Chapel.
The Piscina is undoubtedly pre-Reformation work, and though its apparent antiquity may be partly due to the weather, yet it is, I think certainly of what is called the Decorated style of architecture: Personally, I have not met with a more interesting Piscina in any other Church in the neighbourhood.
To sum up the result of our considerations in this article: The three Architectural Features which we have now been dealt with would lead us to believe that the old Chapel of Bream was erected in the 14th century, in the reign, let us say, of Edward Third or Richard Second, and not much later than what we call our Mother Church of Newland; but the original windows having proved too small, new ones were pierced in the old stone about a century or a century and a half later.
It is possible, of course, that there may have been a Chapel here before the 14th century, of which all records and fragments may have perished, but we cannot now enquire into this question, having no evidence before us upon which to base a sound opinion.
Next month, I fear, we shall find the old Chapel was a very insignificant building, quite unknown outside its own immediate neighbourhood.
E.F.E.


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