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Issue Number: 317  January   1901

St. James's Parish Magazine
BREAM
January 1901. No.317


BAPTISMS.
November 28-Gertrude Olive, daughter of Thomas and Gertrude Annie Teague, Bream's Tufts. collier.
December 9-Norah Blanche, daughter of Frederick John and Mary Ann Watkins, Maypole, Bream, collier.
December 10-Charlotte Lilian, driughter of Frederick Charles and Louisa Brice, Bream's Tufts, collier (privately).
December 12-Harold Beaton, son of Richard and Clara Watkins, Bream's Woodside, collier.
December 19-Frederick Thomas, son of Frederick George and Henrietta White, Bream's Woodside, collier.
December 19-Mary Ann, daughter of William and Alice Powell, Castleford, Yorkshire, collier.

MARRIAGE.
December 25 -By the vicar, Edwin Morgan and Elizabeth James, both of Brockhollands, Bream.

BURIALS.
December 2-Elizabeth Brown, 35, Newerne Street, Lydney, aged 66 years.
December 14-Annie Mida Fletcher, New Mills, near Lydney, aged 3 months.
December 21-Samuel Colston Cyril Humphries, Bream's Eaves, aged 2 months.
December 23-James Baker, Oakmood, Bream, aged 74 years.

SPECIAL NOTICES.
January 1-Feast of the Circumcision.
January 6-Feast af the Epiphany.
January 25 -Feast of the Conversion of St. Paul.

OBITUARY.
In the name of many old parishioners of Bream, to whom the late Lady Campbell was well known, and by whom her many acts of kindness are still remembered, we desire to offer our respectful sympathy to Sir James Campbell in his bereavement.

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS.
The Vicar wishes to thank the Church decorators for their work of love in adorning God's House at Bream, Yorkley Wood and the Firs.
The Vicar wishes all parishioners A HAPPY NEW YEAR.

SCHOOL CHILDREN'S ENTERTAINMENT.
This Christmas two performances were given according to the programme printed below, viz., on December 20th at 1s., and on December 21st at 6d., and notwithstanding rain and wind the new room was well filled each night with a most orderly and appreciative audience. Everything in the programme was capitally rendered, and the Vicar voiced the general feeling when, speaking on the second evening, he offered congratulations to Mr. Mullan and Mr. Kidson and the children upon the complete success of their efforts. The net profits amounted to ;£10 2s. 11d., towards freeing the new room from debt. Programme :-
Chorus-" Laughing Song " ................................
Handbells.. .......................................................................Selection
Song in Character-"The Harmonious Shoeblack" ........6 Boys
Chorus- "Daisy Farm" .........................................
Song in Character-"Paddy Blake"................................. 6 Boys
Song-"The Whistle"............................................................Boys
Song in Character-"Eight little Mothers,"..................... 8 Girls
Handbells...........................................................................Selection
Song in Character-" Busy Housemaids " ...,...................8 Girls
Chorus-"Schneider's Band " ...........................................
Song and Drill-"Handkerchief Song"..............................12 Girls
Whistles.. .......................;..................................................Selection
Song in Character-"Old Age " .........................................8 Girls
Chorus-" Old Black Pete ............................................
Handbells ..........................................................................Selection
Song in Character-''The Waggoners," Chorus ...............7 Boys

"The Doll's Wedding." Characters :
Fairy Goodluck .....................................................Amy Mullan
Bride .....................................................................Cissie Bradley
Bridesmaids-Alice Vaughan, Dulcie Morse, Clara Ridler, Emily Jenkins, Nellie Fewings, Elsie Adams.
Tinker-"Kettles to mend"....................................Charlie Wintle
Tailor-"The Tailor's the Man "...........................John Croome
Soldiers-"We're little Wooden Soldiers"..Ed. Lee, Chas. Carpenter, Ernest Ellway, Oliver Wilks, Alfred Robbins, Hy.Miles
Sailor-"I'm a Sailor bold and free .......................Fred Mullan.
Apothecary-"An Apothecary learned" ...............Lionel Jenkins
Ploughboy-"I'm a merry farmers Boy" ..............Reggie Bevan
Poorman-"Rags and tatters," .............................Reggie Jenkins
Thief-"A very greedy one" .................................Willie Worgan
Policeman A-"The Guardian of the Law "..........Lynn Fewings
Policeman B-" A gallant P.C." ...........................Willie Jones
" Chorus of Fairies, &c." "National Anthem."

THE BATTEN MEMORIAL.
The money hitherto collected amounts to about thirty pounds, and no one will consider it otherwise than as a handsome amount, especially as about five-sixths of it has been gathered within the parish.
Unfortunately, however, bells are expensive ornaments, costing seven guineas per cwt., and ten pounds extra for the fittings, so that unlesss we receive another ten pounds we
we shall not be able to hang four cwt. bell, as we greatly desire to do.
In these circumstances, we intend to wait a little while, in the hope that those who are able to do so will give further help, for we should not like to dedicate to the Glory of God an ornament which was not good of its kind.
E.F.E.

HISTORICAL SCRAPS
The following further specimens of entries in the Newland Vestry Book in the seventeeth and eighteenth centuries will perhaps be found interesting and amusing.
The Parish of Newland must be understood to have been divided into several parts which in this book are called Tithings, namely "Newland Tything,"which probably included a good many outlying, detached portions of the Parish; "Coleford Tything;" "Clowerwell Tything;" and "Breem Tything;" the two last being sometimes cited together as ''Clowerwell and Bream Tything."

In 1713 the rates of these Tithings produced the following sums--"Newland, £7 14s. 5d. ; "Coleford, £8 0s. 9d ;" "Clowerwell, £9 2s. 5d.. ;" and " Breem, £3 11s. 0d." and at that time there seems to have been a larger number of defaulters who refused to pay their rates in Bream than in the other Tithings. It seems odd to find the ratetable value of Clearwell greater than that of Coleford, and doubly odd when, turning to another page, to find this somewhat ludicrous statement under the years 1738-1740.-"The Spanish War." Paid expenses of the Sheriff when Warr was proclaimed at Coleford against Spain, 8/-."Why His Majesty King George the Second should have thought it worth while to declare warr against Spain at Coleford does not appear very evident: perhaps, however, it was the exuberant loyalty of the parishioners that induced them to fee the Sheriff, and if so they certainly had him cheap.

Some of the names of Parish Officers seem quite familiar, and it is possible they may have been ancestors of families living in or near Bream today. the names are given under the dates of their appointment in Vestry, viz :-"1658 David James chosen Overseer, and James Club Surveyor of highways, for Breem." "1659, Mr. Edmund Bond chosen Churchwarden for Coleford and Breem, and (1659 continued) John Gunder (probably the same as Gunter) chosen Overseer and Thomas Preest Surveyor of highways for Breem." One supposes that Edmund Bond having the prefix "Mr." before his name may have been of gentle birth one of the Bonds, perhaps, of "Wye Seal."


Perhaps the most funny entries of all are the following :- "1694. Pd. to James Masters, for 1 fox killed at Brockhollands xiid. Paid to Madam Stephens' man, for 1 fox killed at Noxon xiid." 1735.Paid to Thomas Powell for 2 foxes and 1 hedgehog 2/4." 1738. Pd. John Kear, of Breem, for 4 Badgers 4/-." " 1765. Pd for destroying one wild catt 1/-." " 1757. 2 hedgehogs 8d."

Here again some of the names are familiar enough, but the poor wild catt is oddly spelt, and why the said catt should have been worth a shilling, while the hedgehogs were only valued at 4d. each does not appear, nor, indeed, is it clear why any of these beasts could command so much money when money was worth far more than it is today. That the destruction of eight wild catts should have sufficed to pay the expenses of the Sheriff in declaring war against Spain at Coleford seems ludicrous enough. It looks as if the Vestry in those days must have had a surplus which they knew not what to do with, and were apt to pass somewhat suddenly from the sublime to the ridiculous, or, to be quite serious, it looks as if a scare of "Witchcraft" had passed over the parish, lasting from 1694 to 1757-sixty three years. If this were the case, it is a good thing that the panic exhausted itself in the destruction of wild catts, instead of, as in the neighbouring Kingdom of Scotland, in the burning of old women.
E.F.E.


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